Daughter blames U.S. Marshals Service for Marion Co. murder-suic - WNEM TV 5

Daughter blames U.S. Marshals Service for Marion Co. murder-suicide

Posted: Updated: July 19, 2013 06:43 PM
The daughter of the man known as Paul Dome in Jefferson, Texas confirms he was, in fact, Clarence Crouch, a former Hell's Angel who turned state's witness in a murder trial more than 30 years ago. (Photo source: Larry Simpson) The daughter of the man known as Paul Dome in Jefferson, Texas confirms he was, in fact, Clarence Crouch, a former Hell's Angel who turned state's witness in a murder trial more than 30 years ago. (Photo source: Larry Simpson)
Police believe the man known as Paul Dome shot his wife and stepson before setting their home on fire and turning the gun on himself. Police believe the man known as Paul Dome shot his wife and stepson before setting their home on fire and turning the gun on himself.
Jackee Taylor the U.S. Marshals Service has not been responsive to requests for help in obtaining the proper paperwork her father needed to get help from Social Security and Medicaid. Jackee Taylor the U.S. Marshals Service has not been responsive to requests for help in obtaining the proper paperwork her father needed to get help from Social Security and Medicaid.
MARION CO., TX (KSLA) -

The daughter of the man who police say shot his wife and stepson last week in Marion County is speaking out, blaming the U.S. Marshals Service for the desperate actions Paul Dome is believed to have taken last week.

"People need to know what happened, what transpired, what led up to these events," Taylor says, and how he was done wrong by the U.S. Marshals."

In an exclusive interview with KSLA News 12, Taylor confirms rumors that the man known as Paul Dome is in fact Clarence Crouch, a former Hell's Angel and convicted killer who turned state's witness in a fellow Hell's Angel's murder trial in the early 80s. "My father had a very troubled past," says Taylor. "He did things that he was not proud of, I'm not proud of."

Jackee Taylor says she and her whole family have spent the past three decades in the Federal Witness Protection Program, which is operated by the U.S. Marshals Service. "You know, people think that we get money and put places and we have this wonderful new life. That's not the case at all. I was put on the program when I was 7 years old. I had no rights, I signed no papers, and I'm just in constant turmoil in my life, because I have no identity." She says that's because the U.S. Marshals Service has not been responsive to requests for help in obtaining the proper paperwork. It's that alleged lack of response that drove her father, disabled by osteoarthritis and other painful ailments, to the edge.

Dome is believed to have shot his 85-year-old wife Vivian and her 61-year-old stepson Willard in their home on June 10 before setting it on fire and turning a gun on himself. Taylor says her father was in pain and at the end of his rope. "His wife was 85 years old, legally blind, she was also taking care of her terminally ill son who had brain cancer, so he didn't have very long to live. My father was trying to take care of both of them, and in his horrible physical condition was trying to maintain this entire household while not receiving medical attention. How long can a person do that?"

The U.S. Marshals Service has declined a request for comment on the case, and referred us instead to a fact sheet provided online about the Federal Witness Protection Program. That fact sheet says that "Witnesses receive financial assistance for housing, subsistence for basic living expenses and medical care. Job training and employment assistance may also be provided." But Taylor says that didn't happen. "He could not receive Social Security, Medicare, disability. They provided him with no records of his past."

She showed us copies of letters she says her father sent to the U.S. Marshals Service, asking for help. "Everything he requested, I have it all right here. I have copies of everything." Those letters, and piles of other documents, were left in a truck Taylor says Dome made sure she would get after his death. Those requests for help, she says, went unanswered. "He could not receive Social Security, Medicare, disability. They provided him with no records of his past."

She says it's happened to her, too. "I've come out in recent years because of problems that I've had not being able to obtain a passport a birth certificate, I can't go back to college, I can't leave the country, I can't get a marriage license." Most recently, she says she was hung up on after asking for assistance in cremating her father. "They laughed in my face and hung up on me. Well, he said 'Good luck with that' and hung up on me."

After telling her story to a Toledo newspaper in 2010, she says she began to hear from others who have struggled with similar problems as they tried to live their lives in the Federal Witness Protection Program. Among them, a young man who was placed into the program at the age of 9, who now can't go to college and is having trouble making ends meet. "I don't know how that kid gets out of bed in the morning. he's working as a musician because that's all he can do right now."

It's one of the reasons Taylor feels children should not be placed into the program. But in light of what has happened with her father, she says she is more motivated than ever to make sure his death, along with Vivian and Willard's, are not in vain. "This was a horrible tragedy that could have been prevented. If somebody would have done their job."

Larry Simpson, a longtime friend of Domes, says Dome revealed his past to him over the course of the more than 15 years they knew each other. Simpson says his friend was in constant pain, even as he continued to manage the RV park he and Vivian owned and operated. "He was totally, totally always in pain," Simpson says. Of Vivian, he says, "I know for a fact, he did love her."

As close to Paul Dome as he says he was, Simpson says he'll never know what prompted him to take his wife's life and the life of her son before taking his own. Reaction around town has been one of shock and sadness, as those who knew the family try to make sense of it.
 
One thing his daughter feels for sure, is that "If he would have been receiving proper medical attention he would have been able to deal with this situation better, and I believe wholeheartedly this would have never happened." That's why she would like the see the program abolished altogether. "It's horribly flawed, and it's just a joke."

Taylor says she is considering her legal options, including filing a civil rights claim. "Absolutely. My civil rights have been violated for 25 years."

In spite of the fact that she has gone public with her identity, one thing she says she does not have the option of doing is to reclaim it. For that, she says she's been told she could be charged with fraud.

For now, she is concentrating on trying to tie up loose ends and making arrangements for her father's remains. She says there will be no memorial service, but his ashes will be spread in a place he loved.

The Marion County Sheriff's Office investigation continues, and they are still waiting on autopsies to confirm the victims' cause of death. But as far as local authorities are concerned, the man found shot to death apparently by his own hand remains identified by his Texas driver's license as Paul Dome.

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