Mother speaks out after her son nearly died from synthetic LSD - WNEM TV 5

Mother speaks out after her son nearly died from synthetic LSD

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According to the DEA, the synthetic drug is made with a chemical called 25I, which is more potent than any other hallucinogenic compound. Very small amounts can cause seizures, cardiac and respiratory arrest, or even death. (Photo source: WLOX) According to the DEA, the synthetic drug is made with a chemical called 25I, which is more potent than any other hallucinogenic compound. Very small amounts can cause seizures, cardiac and respiratory arrest, or even death. (Photo source: WLOX)
HANCOCK COUNTY, MS (WLOX) -

With just a few clicks on the internet anyone can get what law enforcement officials are calling synthetic LSD shipped to their home. The chemical compound is meant to give drug users the same kind of feeling as actual LSD.

According to the DEA, the synthetic drug is made with a chemical called 25I, which is more potent than any other hallucinogenic compound. Very small amounts can cause seizures, cardiac and respiratory arrest, or even death.

"It was probably one of the scariest experiences I had ever been through," a Diamondhead mother said, "to look at your child that way and wonder if they are going to make it. "

The mother, who wishes to keep her identity concealed, said early Saturday morning she got a phone call that her son was in the hospital and had overdosed on drugs.

"I get there and he was having seizures and stopped breathing three times, but his drug screen came back clean except for a low dose of marijuana," she said. "They didn't know what exactly he had consumed or how he consumed it."

Doctors did not know what to do and told her to prepare for the worst.

"I don't think there were any words to describe it. You always assume it will be you before it will be them," she said. "To see your child laying there and to stop breathing and depending on someone else to save his life. Knowing, as a mother, you can't do anything, it's pretty, pretty overwhelming."

Her son had gone to a friend's house for the night when she said she believes they tried the synthetic drug.

"He has no recollection of anything past them showing up at the house and starting to hang out," she said. "After that, he remembers absolutely nothing."

She has been told her son started acting irate and out of control, so someone called 911. Her son was hit with a stun gun twice, but it didn't stop him. That's when a sheriff's deputy called an ambulance.

"Thankfully, Officer Coleman, I really owe it to him, I think he was the one that stepped in and said, 'We got to do something. We got to call 911,'" she explained. "I think if he didn't do that, we wouldn't be sitting here talking about it right now. Not in this way."

She said her son's friend also went to the hospital from an apparent overdose, but was having a different kind of reaction, and wasn't telling anyone what the boys had taken.

After a few days in the hospital, her son is at home recovering. She hopes her story serves as a warning for parents and teens.

"You keep up with their phone records, you check their Facebook randomly, you check out their rooms randomly. You know, I monitor everywhere he goes and who he's with," she said. "I thought as a parent I had done all the right things.

Hancock County Sheriff Ricky Adam said this is the first case they have had with this synthetic drug. His deputies are trying to find out exactly what is in the drug and what can be done to prosecute those dealing the drug.

"We hope it's not going to become a widespread problem. And we encourage parents to absolutely know what your kids are doing, know who they are running with," Adam said.

Investigators believe a female Diamondhead teen, who also apparently overdosed on synthetic LSD this weekend, got the drug from the same local dealer. Until they know what is in the drug, they cannot prosecute the dealer.

But this mother is not going to sit back and wait.

"As a parent I'm going to try and see what I can do to maybe change that law to where the kids can't get away with these kinds of things," she said. "I don't think they realize it takes just one little amount, just one time caving to peer pressure can cause them their life. In the way it affected me, I'm going to step forward and see what I can do. If it's write letters to Congress, whatever to change these laws to make the others responsible."

And she has a message for parents. "Try harder," she said. "If you think you are doing all the normal things I was doing, do more."

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