Appeals court upholds Michigan's emergency manager law - WNEM TV 5

Appeals court upholds Michigan's emergency manager law

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FLINT, MI (WNEM) -

A highly debated topic continues to stir controversy as an appeals court decides to uphold Michigan's emergency manager law.

Some said the law amounts to nothing more than taxation without representation, but the court's ruling said there is no fundamental right to elect local government officials.

Since the governor admitted the system failed the residents in Flint, some believe it's time for a change.

"The government is what got us where we are right now. So I guess I don't trust what they are doing anyway," said Courtney Fairrington, Flint resident.

A federal court of appeals upheld the emergency manager law on Monday, saying it does not violate the constitutional rights of Michigan voters.

Then panel of judges acknowledged emergency managers might not be the perfect answer, but the law is mostly related to turning around local governments.

Fairrington said she doesn't think the state should have that kind of power.

"I don't think they should be appointed to put whoever in. I think it should be the people because we are the ones suffering," she said.

Flint was under the control of an emergency manager during the switch to Flint River water and the beginning of the water crisis.

Dennis Martineau, Flint resident, said sometimes it's necessary for the state to take over in severe cases of corruption financial hardships.

"I feel like if they have a reason to then yes. If they conduct an investigation and there is criminal activity then yes," Martineau said.

Resident Alexis Barrera said the damage from the last emergency manager in Flint has already been done and believes it would be wrong to put one in again.

"No, I don't think it's right because it seems like they have already screwed things up enough in this city. So they should just leave it to the people to try and elect the person that is right," Barrera said.

The next step for people trying to overturn the law is to appeal the ruling directly to the Supreme Court, but it's not clear if that will happen.

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