Las Vegas officials give timeline of mass shooting - WNEM TV 5

Las Vegas officials give timeline of mass shooting

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People carry a peson at the Route 91 Harvest country music festival after apparent gun fire was heard on October 1, 2017 in Las Vegas, Nevada. There are reports of an active shooter around the Mandalay Bay Resort and Casino. (Photo by David Becker/Getty) People carry a peson at the Route 91 Harvest country music festival after apparent gun fire was heard on October 1, 2017 in Las Vegas, Nevada. There are reports of an active shooter around the Mandalay Bay Resort and Casino. (Photo by David Becker/Getty)
This undated photo provided by the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department shows Marilou Danley. Danley was taken in for questioning in connection with the investigation into the active shooter incident on Sunday, Oct. 1, 2017. (LVPD via AP) This undated photo provided by the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department shows Marilou Danley. Danley was taken in for questioning in connection with the investigation into the active shooter incident on Sunday, Oct. 1, 2017. (LVPD via AP)
(Sources: CNN/AP) Families, friends, co-workers and neighbors shared stories Monday about some of those slain and the hundreds more who were injured after a gunman opened fire on festivalgoers. (Sources: CNN/AP) Families, friends, co-workers and neighbors shared stories Monday about some of those slain and the hundreds more who were injured after a gunman opened fire on festivalgoers.
(Source: KVVU) Las Vegas PD releases timeline of events leading up to police entering mass shooting suspect's hotel room. (Source: KVVU) Las Vegas PD releases timeline of events leading up to police entering mass shooting suspect's hotel room.

LAS VEGAS (CNN/AP) -- Sheriff Joseph Lombardo of Las Vegas Metropolitan Police released a timeline of what occurred the night that 59 people, including the gunman, were killed.

10:05 p.m.: First shots fired by the suspect. This was seen on closed-circuit television from the concert venue.

10:12: First two officers arrive on the 31st floor and announce the gunfire is coming from directly above them.

10:15: The last shots are fire from the suspect, as per the body worn camera.

10:17: The first two officers arrive on the 32nd floor.

10:18: A hotel security officer tells the LVMPD officers that he was shot and gives them the exact location of the suspect’s room.

10:26-10:30: Eight additional officers arrived on the 32nd floor and begin to move down the hallway. They clear every room and look for injured people. The officers move forward because they no longer hear gunshots.

10:55: Eight officers arrive in the stairwell at the opposite end of the hallway nearest to the suspect’s room.

11:20: The first breach was set off and officers entered the room. They observed the suspect down on the ground and saw a second door that could not be accessed from their position.

11:27: The second breach was set off allowing officers to access the second room. Officers quickly realized there was no one else in the rooms and announced over the radio that the suspect was down. Las Vegas police said they did not find a suicide note after entering the hotel room.

Authorities said they are still investigating and expect to continue exploring the hotel room and the suspect's house for at least five more days. 

_____

Las Vegas mass shooter Stephen Paddock rented a room in downtown Las Vegas through Airbnb at The Ogden around the same time as the Life is Beautiful concert, Clark County Sheriff Joseph Lombardo said Wednesday

The Life is Beautiful concert took place from September 22 to 25.

Lombardo said investigators have recovered video from the Ogden to review Paddock's actions while he was there.

_____

Marilou Danley said that she was worried her boyfriend, Stephen Paddock, was going to break up with her when he bought her a cheap ticket to the Philippines about two weeks ago, then wired her money to buy her and her family a house there.

But Danley, in a statement read by her attorney, said she didn't know Paddock had planned to carry out a mass shooting.

In her first public remarks since Paddock killed 58 people and wounded more than 500 in Las Vegas on Sunday night, Danley said Paddock -- a man she described as "kind" -- never gave her any clues or any warning "that something horrible like this was going to happen."

"It never occurred to me in any way whatsoever that he was planning violence against anyone," she said in the statement.

Danley, who lived with Paddock in Mesquite, Nevada and was out of the country during the shooting, returned to the United States on Tuesday night from the Philippines and spoke to the FBI and the Las Vegas police, her attorney Matt Lombard confirmed.

"I will cooperate fully with their investigation," she said in the statement. "Anything I can do to help ease suffering and help in any way, I will do."

[Related: Shooter's girlfriend didn't know of attack plans

Motive still a mystery

Danley's statement sheds little light on what led the 64-year-old retired accountant to fire from his 32nd-floor hotel room window into a crowd of 22,000 concertgoers in the heart of Las Vegas.

Almost three days after the deadliest mass shooting in modern American history, investigators appear no closer to answering the question: Why?

Why did he continue firing with an arsenal of weapons for nine to 11 minutes?

At this point, Paddock's motive and aims remain a mystery to investigators. FBI Deputy Director Andrew McCabe told CNBC on Wednesday that the lack of a clear motive was a "surprise" in this mass shooting.

"This one is somewhat different than many of the ones we've dealt with in the past, because we don't have any immediately accessible thumbprints that would indicate the shooter's ideology or motivation, or really what compelled him to get there," McCabe said.

Police believe Paddock acted alone when he sprayed gunfire on the crowd at the Route 91 Harvest festival.

McCabe told CNN that the FBI was going through Paddock's communications, financial records, associates and video surveillance -- anything to try to piece together the puzzle of his motive.

"We will look at every one of those lanes, pull every possible thread," he said.

Authorities are hoping to find answers from their interview with Danley on Wednesday.

Girlfriend 'sent away' before attack

In an interview with CNN affiliate Seven Network Australia, Danley's sisters said that Danley did not know about the shooting and was "sent away" before the attack.

Danley entered the Philippines on September 15 and again on September 25, traveling on her Australian passport, said Maria Antoinette Mangrobang, spokeswoman for the Bureau of Immigration in the Philippines.

Danley's sisters, who were not identified by name and whose faces were blurred, added that Danley would willingly cooperate with investigators.

"Of all the people that they have interviewed ... no one can put the puzzles together -- no one -- except Marilou, because Steve is not here to talk anymore," Danley's sister said. "Only Marilou can maybe help to solve this investigation and what and why he's done this."

Paddock had wired $100,000 to the Philippines, a law enforcement source said, but officials haven't been able to say exactly when the money transfer took place or who was the recipient. The FBI is working with Philippine authorities to determine details.

Danley did not say Wednesday how much money Paddock wired her.

President Donald Trump, who visited Las Vegas victims, first responders and heroes on Wednesday, offered his own analysis of the shooter's motives.

"He's a sick, demented man," Trump said. "The wires are screwed up."

Paddock's violent transformation has mystified everyone -- his brother, investigators and the families he victimized included.

Paddock, who was twice divorced, liked to gamble, and at one time had jobs at the US Post Office and the IRS, had no significant criminal history and was previously unknown to police.

President Trump said that America was a "nation in mourning" on Wednesday and praised the work of first responders, hospital staff, local leaders and the people of Las Vegas.

"Words cannot describe the bravery that the whole world witnessed on Sunday night," he said. "Americans defied death and hatred with love and with courage."

"When ... the worst of humanity strikes, and strike it did, the best of humanity responds," Trump said. "Parents and spouses used their own bodies as shields to protect their loved ones. Americans dashed into a hail of bullets to rescue total strangers."

Separately, a GoFundMe for the victims of Las Vegas has raised almost $9 million as of Wednesday afternoon.

Shooter bought 33 firearms

The evidence laid out by investigators so far shows Paddock meticulously planned the shooting.

He purchased 33 firearms, mostly rifles, between October 2016 and September 2017, according to an ATF spokesperson.

The gunman checked into the room days in advance, stocked a cache of weapons there and set up cameras inside his hotel suite and in the hallway.

The first call reporting shots fired came at 10:08 p.m. Sunday, and the gunfire didn't stop until 10:19 p.m., Clark County Undersheriff Kevin McMahill said. The shooting continued off and on for nine to 11 minutes, he said.

Paddock had an arsenal of weapons in his hotel suite, including bump-fire stocks -- legal devices that enable a shooter to fire bullets rapidly, similar to an automatic rifle.

He had outfitted 12 of his firearms with the bump stocks, said the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives.

The killer also had cameras set up inside and outside the suite. Police don't know if the devices were transmitting -- the FBI is investigating their use -- but the Clark County sheriff said he thinks Paddock might have used them to watch for people approaching his room. One camera looked out the peephole on the suite's door.

The hail of gunfire stopped when security guards approached Paddock's room at the Mandalay Bay Resort and Casino, McMahill said. Paddock turned his attention to those outside his door and fired, wounding one of them.

The guard was "very heroic" and provided police with information about the shooter's location, McMahill said. When officers entered the hotel room, they found Paddock dead. Authorities believe he killed himself.

Wounded security guard recovering

David Hickey, president of the union representing the hotel's officers, identified the wounded guard on Wednesday as Jesus Campos.

Paddock had barricaded the stairwell doors and pointed his makeshift cameras system toward the elevator as Campos approached, said Hickey, head of the International Union, Security, Police and Fire Professionals of America.

Campos, who was shot in the right leg, was out of the hospital on Wednesday. He was expected to have a round removed from his leg at a later date, Hickey said.

The union has seventeen armed officers at Mandalay Bay. Hickey was uncertain if Campos was armed.

Assault-style rifles strewn across room

The UK's Daily Mail newspaper published several photos taken in Paddock's room after the shooting.

They show semi-automatic assault-style rifles on the floor and on furniture. Stacks of ammunition magazines used in rifles can also be seen. One photo shows Paddock's legs splayed on the floor near several weapons, apparently after he killed himself. Police said they're investigating the source of the leaked photos.

The rifles in the photographs were far from the gunman's only weapons. A total of 47 guns have been recovered from three locations: Paddock's hotel room and his two Nevada homes in Verdi and Mesquite.

The guns were bought in Nevada, Utah, California and Texas, said Jill Snyder, special agent in charge of ATF field division in San Francisco.

Authorities also found thousands of rounds of ammunition in Paddock's Mesquite home, and an ingredient used in explosives was discovered inside the killer's car.

____

Body cam evidence

Authorities on Tuesday released the first body camera footage of police responding to the Sunday's mass shooting in Las Vegas. Officers were seen hunkering down behind a wall facing Mandalay Bay Resort and Casino after an initial volley of shots fired by the gunman later identified as Stephen Paddock.

The footage shows officers telling people to get down as police try to figure out where the rounds are coming from, said Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Undersheriff Kevin McMahill. "Go that way, get out of here!

[Click Here to watch the body cam video

'I felt him get shot in the back'

Heather Melton heard the noise interrupting the concert and told her husband, Sonny, she thought it might be gunfire. He, like most people, thought it was fireworks.

Then the bullets started ricocheting off the ground around the Tennessee couple. She wanted to get low; he said, no, we'll get trampled.

So they ran, away from the gunfire, Sonny just behind Heather, until he was felled by a bullet.

"I felt him get shot in the back," she told "Anderson Cooper 360." There were bodies all over the ground.

"I was trying to talk to him and he wasn't responding," said Heather, an orthopedic surgeon. She said she got over him and started doing CPR. People said to get down. Sonny, a registered nurse, was bleeding from the mouth.

Heather Melton said she knew he probably was gone, but she wanted to hope.

Sonny was declared dead at the hospital.

"He was the most selfless person that I ever met, and even until his last breath he proved that," Heather said.

The investigation

Paddock's violent transformation has mystified everyone -- his brother, investigators and the families he victimized.

Police had no prior knowledge of the gunman before the attack. "I don't know how it could have been prevented," Lombardo said.

The massacre has no known link to overseas terrorism or terror groups, a US official with knowledge of the case said. And authorities say it's too early to tell whether the killings were an act of domestic terrorism.

"We have to establish what his motivation was first," Lombardo said.

For an act to be considered terrorism, it must appear that it was intended to intimidate or coerce a civilian population, or try to influence political change.

The gunman's brother, Eric Paddock, said he was "completely befuddled" by his brother's actions.

He said Stephen Paddock was an avid gambler who had "no history of violence. No history of anything -- couldn't give a s*** less about politics, religion, pointy hatted people, etc, etc. He just wanted to get a freaking royal flush."

Running back into danger

The massacre started at about 10 p.m. Sunday at the Route 91 Harvest festival, Sheriff Lombardo said.

Country singer Jason Aldean was on stage when bullets started raining onto the crowd.

"On the main floor ... there was no cover -- they were all exposed," survivor Dees Mansholt said. "So you didn't know if somebody was shot or if they were laying down."

Frantic concertgoers piled on top of each other, trying to get out of the line of fire. But an off-duty nurse ran back into the danger to help those who had been shot.

"We went back because I'm a nurse and I felt I had to," she told CNN affiliate KTNV. "I went to three different scenes, and by the time I got to the third one, there was just dead bodies."

The nurse said she was far from alone.

"There was so many people, just normal citizens, doctors, cops, paramedics, nurses, just off-duty. Everyone was just communicating and working together."

Corrine Lomas recalled the heroism of fellow concertgoers.

"A lot of really good people (were) holding people's wounds shut, trying to help them while everybody was just ducked down," she said.

$4.2 million raised

Countless strangers have rallied to support victims, donating blood, money and supplies.

By Tuesday evening, a GoFundMe page started by a Clark County commissioner had raised more than $4.2 million.

"Funds will be used to provide relief and financial support to the victims and families of the horrific Las Vegas mass shooting," county commission chair Steve Sisolak wrote.

Throngs of blood donors lined up for hours to help the wounded.

"This is America -- people coming together, helping out." Hector Salas tweeted. "Likely more than 1000 people waiting in line to donate blood.

Strangers also donated flights, housing, food and transportation to victims' relatives coming to Las Vegas, Clark County Fire Chief Greg Cassell said.

"It takes the worst of America to also see the best of America," said Mansholt, who survived the gunfire. "Everybody was helping each other."

CNN's David Williams, Dan Simon, Alaa Elassar, Artemis Moshtaghian, Lauren Del Valle, Amanda Jackson, Paul Murphy, Laura Jarrett and Ashleigh Banfield contributed to this report.

Here's what we know about Stephen Paddock, the Las Vegas shooter

"People start screaming and yelling and we start running," said Andrew Akiyoshi, who provided the cellphone video to The Associated Press. "You could feel the panic. You could feel like the bullets were flying above us. Everybody's ducking down, running low to the ground."

While some concertgoers hit the ground Sunday night, others pushed for the crowded exits, shoving through narrow gates and climbing over fences as 40- to 50-round bursts of fire rained down on them from the 32nd floor of the Mandalay Bay casino hotel.

By Monday afternoon, 58 victims were dead and 527 injured in the deadliest mass shooting in modern U.S. history.

"You just didn't know what to do," Akiyoshi said. "Your heart is racing and you're thinking, 'I'm going to die.'"

[Related: 'We stepped over the bodies': Witnesses describe chaotic scene]

The gunman, identified as Stephen Craig Paddock, a 64-year-old retired accountant from Mesquite, Nevada, killed himself before officers stormed Room 135 in the gold-colored glass skyscraper.

The avid gambler who according to his brother made a small fortune investing in real estate had been staying there since Thursday and had busted out windows to create his sniper's perch roughly 500 yards from the concert grounds.

The motive for the attack remained a mystery, with Sheriff Joseph Lombardo saying: "I can't get into the mind of a psychopath at this point."

Paddock had 23 guns — some with scopes — in his hotel room, authorities said. They found two gun stocks that allow the shooter to replicate fully automatic fire, and are investigating whether weapons used in the massacre had those modifications, according to a U.S. official briefed by law enforcement who spoke on condition of anonymity because the investigation is still unfolding.

[Related: Trump on Las Vegas massacre: 'An act of pure evil']

At Paddock's home, authorities found 19 more guns, explosives and thousands of rounds of ammunition. Also, several pounds of ammonium nitrate, a fertilizer that can be turned into explosives such as those used in the 1995 Oklahoma bombing, were in his car, the sheriff said.

"We are continuing with the safety of this community," Sheriff Lombardo said during a press conference on Tuesday. "I assure you that this investigation has not ended with the demise of Stephen Paddock."

The FBI said it found nothing so far to suggest the attack was connected to international terrorism, despite a claim of responsibility from the Islamic State group, which said Paddock was a "soldier" who had recently converted to Islam.

In an address to the country, President Donald Trump called the bloodbath "an act of pure evil" and added: "In moments of tragedy and horror, America comes together as one. And it always has." He ordered flags flown at half-staff.

With hospitals jammed with victims, authorities put out a call for blood donations and set up a hotline to report missing people and speed the identification of the dead and wounded. They also opened a "family reunification center" for people to find loved ones.

"The world has changed. Who could imagine a situation like this?" Lombardo asked. "We have to try to 'what if' these situations when we train and make sure we have the proper response."

[Related: FBI: Vegas shooter had no ties to terror group]

More than 12 hours after the massacre, bodies covered in white sheets were still being removed from the festival grounds.

The shooting began at 10:07 p.m., and the gunman appeared to fire unhindered for more than 10 minutes, according to radio traffic. Police frantically tried to locate him and determine whether the gunfire was coming from Mandalay Bay or the neighboring Luxor hotel.

At 10:14 p.m., an officer said on his radio that he was pinned down against a wall on Las Vegas Boulevard with 40 to 50 people.

"We can't worry about the victims," an officer said at 10:15 p.m. "We need to stop the shooter before we have more victims. Anybody have eyes on him ... stop the shooter."

Near the stage, Dylan Schneider, a country singer who performed earlier in the day, huddled with others under the VIP bleachers, where he turned to his manager and asked, "Dude, what do we do?" He said he repeated the question again and again over the next five minutes.

Bodies were lying on the artificial turf installed in front of the stage, and people were screaming and crying. The sound of people running on the bleachers added to the confusion, and Schneider thought the concert was being invaded with multiple shooters.

"No one knew what to do," Schneider said. "It's literally running for your life and you don't know what decision is the right one. But like I said, I knew we had to get out of there."

He eventually pushed his way out of the crowd and found refuge in the nearby Tropicana hotel-casino, where he kicked in a door to an engineering room and spent hours there with others who followed him.

The shooting started as Aldean closed out the three-day Route 91 Harvest Festival. He had just begun the song "When She Says Baby," and the first burst of nearly 50 shots crackled as he sang, "It's tough just getting up."

Muzzle flashes could be seen in the dark as the gunman fired away.

"It was the craziest stuff I've ever seen in my entire life," said Kodiak Yazzie, 36. "You could hear that the noise was coming from west of us, from Mandalay Bay. You could see a flash, flash, flash, flash."

The crowd, funneled tightly into a wide-open space, had little cover and no easy way to escape. Victims fell to the ground, while others fled in panic. Some hid behind concession stands or crawled under parked cars.

Faces were etched with shock and confusion, and people wept and screamed.

Tales of heroism and compassion emerged quickly: Couples held hands as they ran through the dirt lot. Some of the bleeding were carried out by fellow concertgoers. While dozens of ambulances took away the wounded, some people loaded victims into their cars and drove them to the hospital. People fleeing the concert grounds hitched rides with strangers, piling into cars and trucks.

Some of the injured were hit by shrapnel. Others were trampled or were injured jumping fences.

The dead included at least three off-duty police officers from various departments who were attending the concert, authorities said. Two on-duty officers were wounded, one critically, police said.

Las Vegas Mayor Carolyn Goodman said the attack was the work of a "crazed lunatic full of hate."

The sheriff said authorities believe Paddock acted alone. While Paddock appeared to have no criminal history, his father was a bank robber who was on the FBI's most-wanted list in the 1960s.

As for why Paddock went on the murderous rampage, his brother in Florida, Eric Paddock, told reporters: "I can't even make something up. There's just nothing."

Hours after the shooting, Aldean posted on Instagram that he and his crew were safe and that the shooting was "beyond horrific."

"It hurts my heart that this would happen to anyone who was just coming out to enjoy what should have been a fun night," the country star said.

President Donald Trump tweeted: "My warmest condolences and sympathies to the victims and families of the terrible Las Vegas shooting. God bless you!"

Before Sunday, the deadliest mass shooting in modern U.S. history took place in June 2016, when a gunman opened fire at a gay nightclub in Orlando, Florida, killing 49 people

[Related - Slideshow: Portraits of the victims of the Las Vegas shooting

Sunday's shooting came more than four months after a suicide bombing at an Ariana Grande concert in Manchester, England, that killed 22 people. Almost 90 people were killed by gunmen inspired by Islamic State at the Bataclan concert hall in Paris during a performance by Eagles of Death Metal in November 2015.

"I was hoping and praying that in these situations, a citizen sees something so we (the police) can do something," Lombardo said. "Some people might be afraid to bother the police. Don't be. We ask you to bother the police. If there is anybody in the public space that can assist us, we ask them to."

The Las Vegas gunman transferred $100,000 overseas in the days before the attack and planned the massacre so meticulously that he even set up cameras inside his high-rise hotel room and on a service cart outside his door, apparently to spot anyone coming for him, authorities said Tuesday.

Meanwhile, investigators are taking a harder look at the shooter's girlfriend and what she might have known about the attack, with the sheriff naming her a "person of interest" and saying the FBI is bringing her back to the U.S. on Wednesday for questioning.

Authorities are trying to determine why Stephen Paddock killed 59 people at a country music festival in the deadliest mass shooting in modern U.S. history.

They have been speaking with girlfriend Marilou Danley, 62, who was out the country at the time of the shooting and in the Philippines on Tuesday, and "we anticipate some information from her shortly," Lombardo said.

Lombardo said he is "absolutely" confident authorities will find out what set off Paddock, a 64-year-old high-stakes gambler and retired accountant who killed himself before police stormed his 32nd-floor room.

Paddock transferred $100,000 to the Philippines in the days before the shooting, a U.S. official briefed by law enforcement but not authorized to speak publicly because of the continuing investigation told The Associated Press on condition of anonymity.

Investigators are still trying to trace that money and also looking into a least a dozen reports over the past several weeks that said Paddock gambled more than $10,000 per day, the official said.

Authorities have released a new hotline for families looking for missing loved ones: (800) 536-9488.

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