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Saginaw residents trying to stop drivers constantly speeding in their neighborhood

Residents of a mid-Michigan community are hoping something will be done after years of drivers racing through their neighborhood.
Published: May. 10, 2022 at 7:29 PM EDT
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SAGINAW, Mich. (WNEM) - Residents of a mid-Michigan community are hoping something will be done after years of drivers racing through their neighborhood.

Drivers have been seen going more than ten miles over the speed limit in one Saginaw neighborhood.

David Rousseau claims a lot of people are driving well above the posted 25 Mile Per hour Speed limit on Warwick Street between Davenport and Weiss.

“There’s people going 35, 45, 55, 65, you know higher than that,” Rousseau said.

Rousseau said it is a problem that has worsened over the years, and he wants something done about it.

“We need radar on this street. And if they don’t have enough policemen, I think we should have at least like speed bumps,” Rousseau said.

Ernestina Smith, who lives a few doors down, agrees with Rousseau.

“This is actually like a highway, it’s like a highway because that’s how some speeders come,” Smith said.

Smith said she almost saw a crash Tuesday morning when a driver tried to pass someone who was going the speed limit. She wants people to know this is residential area.

“There’s a lot of children around here and I know that two family members have left this road because of that, it’s not safe,” Smith said.

TV5 spoke with Saginaw Police spokesperson Matthew Gerow to find out what is being done to address this issue. Gerow said patrols have been on Warwick before and they will return soon.

“We’re going to continue to send out proactive patrols out there. Our traffic officer, officer Jackson will be out there trying to run radar and laser,” Gerow said.

Gerow acknowledges there is a problem. He wants residents to know the traffic trailer will be back on Warwick in June. Gerow is also considering other options to curb speeding.

“I’m sure there are people out there that are flying down the road when we don’t see them. And it’s not that we don’t care, it’s just we have to be out there to issue the violations and of course we can’t be out there 24/7,” Gerow said.

As for Rousseau, he fears the worst will happen if more isn’t done.

“I don’t want anybody getting hurt, and I don’t want anybody getting killed. And all my neighbors feel the same way,” Rousseau said.