Investigators recall traumatizing murder case one day after suspect pleads guilty

A seasoned detective says the crime scene at Mark Latunski’s home was the worst thing he had ever seen in his career.
Published: Sep. 23, 2022 at 7:30 PM EDT
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SHIAWASSEE CO., Mich. (WNEM) - A seasoned detective says the crime scene at Mark Latunski’s home was the worst thing he had ever seen in his career.

The traumatic images were on his mind one day after Latunski admitted guilt in the murder of Kevin Bacon.

“I was pretty surprised,” said Michigan State Police Det. Sgt. James Moore.

That was Moore’s reaction to Mark Latunski pleading guilty to open murder Thursday. Latunski admitted to killing Kevin Bacon and eating parts of his body in 2019.

Moore led the investigation into Bacon’s death.

“I had not seen anybody in person located in that manner that Kevin was found,” Moore said. “So it was definitely not something that I normally would respond to.”

Bacon’s mutilated body was found hanging from the ceiling in a secret room in Latunski’s home located in Shiawassee County’s Bennington Township.

Moore was in court Thursday sitting next to Shiawassee County Prosecutor Scott Koerner when Latunski entered his plea.

“He was pretty reserved, pretty stoic, not a lot of emotion, short answers,” Koerner said.

Koerner said the next step for Latunski is a degree hearing scheduled to take place Oct. 18.

“What happens at that degree hearing is that the judge will make a finding of whether it’s first-degree or second-degree murder or manslaughter,” Koerner said.

Koerner believes he has a strong case for first-degree murder which carries a life without parole punishment. He points out that he never thought of offering Latunski a plea deal because of all the evidence.

“It was really gruesome and horrific,” Koerner said. “I guess they’re the words that come to my mind.”

Koerner says it is also historic because it’s the first time someone in Shiawassee County has pleaded guilty to open murder.

Koerner said he will always remember this case.

The same goes for Moore. He said dealing with something like this has the potential to be difficult for everyone involved.

“Don’t be afraid to reach out and talk to people about what you’re thinking, what you observed, and get some help if you need it,” Moore said.