Headshot Sheldon Neeley

It was six years ago when Flint officials switched their water supply from Detroit to the Flint River.

After which lead from the pipes resulted in thousands of people being exposed to contaminated water.

“We can’t allow that to be forgotten,” said Sheldon Neeley, mayor of Flint.

Today Flint mayor Neeley said they’ve inspected thousands of service lines and replaced about 80% of the pipes, but said that their work still isn’t done.

“Every day, every second, every hour that is delayed from this point on, extends the suffering of the community as it relates to the water crisis,” Neeley said.

It’s why even now, during the coronavirus pandemic, Neeley said he’s working with the city council toward creating a better future for Flint’s people.

“Next week the city council will have an opportunity to grant the contract to make sure that we have a second delivery water system online, that was mandated by EGLA and EPA, and paid for by the federal government,” Neeley said.

It’s a goal he said that’s meant to not only rebuild Flint’s water system, but also the trust of Flint’s people.

“As we move through this, lead line replacements, restoration work to our yards, this administration is committed to making sure that we deliver all things necessary to make our community whole again,” Neeley said.

Officials said at least 12,000 children were exposed to dangerous levels of lead and at least 12 people died.

Copyright 2020 WNEM (Meredith Corporation). All rights reserved.

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