GoBabyGo!

A group of college students are doing their part to give mobility to children with cerebral palsy.

“It’s a great project,” said Cassandra Bouchard.

Bouchard’s 2-year-old daughter Gracie has cerebral palsy. On Friday, she received a toy car made just for her.

With the push of a button Gracie has mobility at the edge of her fingertips, thanks to the project GoBabyGo.

“It’s hard for her to get around. So I always fear for what she can’t do and helping her get around the house. Right now she can’t really use it in the house, but hopefully in the summertime she’ll be able to get around outside with her brother,” Bouchard said.

GoBabyGo! is a national community outreach program designed to provide assistive riding cars to children who need them.

University of Michigan-Flint physical therapy students, like Kei-Cze Prentis, spent countless hours modifying a trio of toy cars for three kids who will receive them this year.

“It feels really good. It’s a very passionate subject for all of us,” Prentis said.

Prentis said the children’s reactions are priceless.

“Their faces just lit up when they were in the cars and they got to press the button for the first time and they got to go. Just all smiles,” Prentis said.

Meanwhile, organizers of the event said they are proud of their students.

“The physical therapy students and the mechanical engineering students and other people have just done an amazing job,” said Susan Talley, interim director of the physical therapy department at U of M-Flint.

Talley said the toy vehicles will benefit children for years to come.

“When they outgrow them then they’ll come back to the Genesee Intermediate School District and we’ll repurpose it for another child,” Talley said.

As for Bouchard, she would like to thank everyone who helped make Gracie’s newfound mobility possible.

“Just that she’s happy and she’s able to get around,” Bouchard said.

Copyright 2018 WNEM (Meredith Corporation). All rights reserved.

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