IMAGE: Shiawassee Crash

In mere weeks, Michigan's new no-fault auto insurance laws will go into effect and many families are bracing for impact because they are at risk of losing their care.

In mere weeks, Michigan's new no-fault auto insurance laws will go into effect and many families are bracing for impact because they are at risk of losing their care.

Julie Bise's mother was in a horrible car crash decades ago that left her in a wheelchair for the rest of her life.

"I think she would be devastated," Bise said.

The devastation would be over a new law that would cut coverage for people hurt in auto crashes. That's why the rally that happened in Lansing on Wednesday where hundreds gathered to protest the new law means a lot to her.

Bise said her mother spent her life advocating for insurance coverage changes since the 1970s. When the crash happened, insurance did not have to cover people who needed lifetime care.

But now, some say Michigan’s new auto insurance law would make deep cuts in payments to providers of long-term care and for former and future survivors.

"There is no grandfathering in because if she was at home and she was receiving 24-hour a day attendant care or you know, uh, like with a home health aide. The proposal is that this is going to be a reduction of 55 percent. There's no company out there that can sustain by taking a 55 percent cut in the medical field," Bise said.

On Wednesday, protestors at the state capitol urged lawmakers to act on bills that would address certain upcoming changes to Michigan’s auto no-fault law.

Bise is a nurse who works with people who have had spinal cord injuries. She said that leaves many of her patients with an uncertain future.

"To say I don't know what's going to happen, they've already had the catastrophic insult. And now it's like insulting them again, because we are, we are on the brink of taking away their care," Bise said.

Bise believes the new insurance law will impact thousands of people who were hurt in crashes and the medical professionals who care for them. The new insurance law is set to take effect on July 1.

Bise does not think this will save drivers any money.

"They're not going to pay less. We're not going to see a difference,” Bise said.

Advocates will continue to push the Michigan legislature to fix the auto no-fault reforms before July 1.

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