Flint water system complies with lead standards during upgrades

Flint’s water system has met the state’s Lead and Copper Rule (LCR) during the past year’s...
Flint’s water system has met the state’s Lead and Copper Rule (LCR) during the past year’s multimillion-dollar project to modernize the city’s drinking water system.(Michigan Department of Environment, Great Lakes, and Energy)
Published: Jul. 22, 2022 at 2:57 PM EDT
Email This Link
Share on Pinterest
Share on LinkedIn

FLINT, Mich. (WNEM) - Flint’s water system has met the state’s Lead and Copper Rule (LCR) during the past year’s multimillion-dollar project to modernize the city’s drinking water system.

The city of Flint is now in its sixth year of meeting state and federal standards of lead in drinking water, the Michigan Department of Environment, Great Lakes, and Energy (EGLE) said.

Flint’s water system has tested below action levels during 12 consecutive monitoring periods.

The latest six-month monitoring period, from Jan. 1 through June 30, shows the 90th calculation for the samples collected is at 10 parts per billion for lead under the state rule that requires a fifth liter sample to better reflect the impact of lead service line, EGLE said.

The latest testing result is higher than the last six-month period, which was 7 parts per billion. More non-residential, Tier 2, sites have been added to the city’s sampling pool. Most residential, Tier 1, sites have had their lead service lines replaces and do not meet the criteria to be included in the 90th percentile calculation, EGLE stated.

The 90th percentile calculation of 10 parts per billion means 90 percent of the test results used in the calculation came in at or below 10 parts per billion.

“As Flint nears completion of its lead service line replacement program, we are seeing clear evidence that the focus will need to shift to interior plumbing and continued education on how to reduce lead exposures in the home as outlined on the state’s Mi Lead Safe web site,” said Kris Donaldson EGLE’s Clean Drinking Water Public Advocate.

EGLE said the drinking water samples used in the latest test results were calculated from 61 homes and businesses known to have lead service lines. Forty of the sites were single-family homes and 21 others were businesses.

Excavations have been used to determine the material of service lines at 95 percent of the residential locations. Flint officials urge any remaining water customers who may have lead service lines to use the city’s free replacement program.